Discussing the U.S. Open 2014: Possible Winners and Success of Bellis

Discussing the U.S. Open 2014: Possible Winners and Success of Bellis

cici bellis 300x200 Discussing the U.S. Open 2014: Possible Winners and Success of Bellis

Yesterday we have discussed the U.S.Open 2014 with a tennis coach.

Who will win the U.S.Open 2014? Does Roger Federer have one more chance for win the Grand Slam in New York? Is Serena Williams still unbeatable?

Roger Federer looks great and should get to the final against Novak Djokovic. I’d make Djokovic a very slight favorite.

Serena Williams will win unless she breaks a leg. Maybe Bellis will challenge her in five years, but nobody else looks close. Genie Bouchard should be Serena’s toughest match this year. I should add that Petra Kvitova’s win at Wimbledon was the best any woman not named Serena Williams has played since Steffi Graf and Monica Seles. I just don’t think she can do it twice.

Will 15 years old “CiCi” Bellis become a new American tennis star?

Yes, Catherine “CiCi” Bellis is the real thing. She is the most talented player in the draw of this U.S. Open.

Bellis is well-coached and her parents have enough money to keep her away from the USTA.

Her serve is a liability. She doesn’t know how to play points, and doesn’t think she can miss, but she’s just fifteen. I’m trying to imagine what Catherine “CiCi” Bellis will do when she’s two years older and twenty pounds heavier.

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22 Things Brilliant Athletic Coaches Do

22 things brilliant coaches do:

1. Have a growth mindset.
2. Know their athletes.
3. Keep instructions simple
4. Teach the fundamentals well and stay close to them.
5. Connect with their athletes
6. Educate their athletes.
7. Communicate with parents.
8. Listen to their athletes.
9. Lead by example.
10. Have passion for what they do.
11. Begin with the end in mind.
12. Give their athletes structure.
13. Create a positive environment.
14. Don’t have ‘favorites’.
15. Constantly are self learning and educating themselves
16. Don’t just make better athletes, but people.
17. Have high standards and discipline.
18. They also have goals and other interests.
19. Teach skills before drills.
20. Focus on the strengths & positives first, then build from there.
21. Use imagery and visuals as examples in coaching.
22. End practices on a positive note.

22things 300x116 22 Things Brilliant Athletic Coaches Do

Can you think of any more? Write yours in the comments below!

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The Curse of Multimedia and the Internet in the Coaching Industry

I actually never do this, but thought I’d have a look on Youtube today at coaching drills, exercises, tip etc..

Allistair McCaw 300x283 The Curse of Multimedia and the Internet in the Coaching Industry

Wow, that’s all I can say! Just astonished by some of the absolute garbage you find posted on multimedia websites like YouTube. ‘Guru trainers and coaches’ selling ’their’ drills and exercises. Just cannot believe people can buy into this.

I came across a guy on YouTube (I will with hold his name) who has taken drills straight of my method, tried to do himself, then telling people to subscribe to his page for $39.95 month!
The quality of the drills was laughable. In fact, when I think of it almost tragic, that some uninformed people will follow this instruction. He didn’t have a clue.

People, before you buy, subscribe or ‘follow’ one of these self proclaimed ‘Guru’s’, first check which athletes they have trained (if any) and what they have actually done, coaching wise.
There are so many expert marketers out there selling their ‘coaching skills’, when in fact they are taking you for a credit card ride.

Most of these ‘Guru’s’ don’t even understand the how, let alone the why.

My advice is to do your homework thoroughly before you take advice from someone or a fancy well designed coaching website.

It’s time these ‘YouTube coaches’ where found out. It’s ruining our industry, actually worse, it’s potentially injuring athletes.

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Shakira Said It Best: “The Hips Don’t Lie”

I believe that one of the most overlooked areas in an athletes training program when it comes to staying healthy and having better movement, is the hips.

Shakira 300x191 Shakira Said It Best: “The Hips Don’t Lie”

Great movement in sport relies on the strength, flexibility and range of motion of the joints and muscles in your lower body, starting from the ground and working up.

An athlete’s hips are their powerhouse, and any weakness or energy leak through the kinetic chain results in a significant power outage. The hip is a joint that has a wide range of motion that moves through many different planes and different angles. The hip acts as a rotator, extensor and flexor which helps transfer forces between the lower and upper body extremities. In fact, the hip is loaded with over 230% of weight when only walking! (Hence my importance focused on single leg/uni-lateral work too).

For an athlete to become more powerful and explosive, it is important that he or she also addresses lower body imbalances with stability, strengthening and flexibility exercises, all geared to improving their ability to move more easier and efficiently. Most lower back injuries stem from tightness in the hips and glute area’s.

In my method of training, I believe in a ‘hips before, hip after’ approach. What that means is that I’ll have the athlete perform a hip strengthening exercise before they start their training session and a hip mobility routine after using the MM stretch strap (www.themccawmethod.com/mccaw-method-products). Doing this routine immediately after a session while the body is still warm, helps the athlete fully optimize their mobility, flexibility and range of motion.

I have my athletes work on their hip strength and mobility at almost every session, also as part of their prehab routines. Exercises like the mini band monster walks, half foam roller squats and their post workout stretch routine.

Remember, that the hips don’t lie, so make sure you take a proactive approach to taking good care of them.

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